Tagged: trials

Revising E Michaelmas Biology for 2016 trials

If you are revising for E Michaelmas trials next week, I suggest you go through this checklist and make sure you understand each point fully….. This list could be the basis for making some revision notes.

  • Understand the differences between atoms and molecules
  • What is a polymer?  Give some biological examples of polymers and describe their structure.
  • What are the chemical tests for glucose and starch?
  • How do enzymes work as catalysts?
  • Draw a graph to show how temperature effects the rate of an enzyme-catalysed reaction.  Annotate the graph to explain why this pattern is observed.
  • Now do the same but for the effect of pH on enzyme reactions…..
  • Write down the word and balanced chemical equations for photosynthesis.
  • Why is photosynthesis such an important process in the plant (and in the ecosystem)?
  • Draw an annotated diagram to show the structure of a leaf and how it is adapted for photosynthesis.
  • How do you test a leaf for starch?  How do you measure rates of photosynthesis using an aquatic plant? What variables could you alter in this set up?
  • Explain differences in function between xylem and phloem.
  • How is water absorbed in root hair cells?  Explain osmosis (good luck!)
  • What are the differences between diffusion and active transport?  Give two biological examples of each.
  • What is transpiration?  How can you measure it?
  • What factors affect rates of transpiration in a plant?
  • What is the difference between a pesticide and a fertiliser?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of chemical pesticides and biological control of pests?

How to answer multiple choice questions: a quick guide

Many of the students I teach are facing end-of-term exams next week.  And for my Y9 and Y10 students these are multiple choice papers which pose a different challenge to the more usual structured answer format.  So here is a quick PMG guide to help you score the highest mark you can on this kind of paper.  Good luck!

1) Don’t underestimate the opposition!

The biggest mistake students make with these exams is to be over-confident.  The reason GCSE exams no longer contain any multiple choice questions is because it was felt that this type of question is too difficult.  The examiner, by selecting four incorrect responses to every question, is trying to catch you out and the more plausible the incorrect responses, the better the question!  So your understanding needs to be really good to not be tricky by these underhand tactics…. Get revising!

2) Read the question carefully.

This skill is tested even more fully in a multiple choice exam. You spend less time writing answers (obviously), so this allows more time for reading and thinking.  Even with a “mark a minute” time frame, there is time for thinking and planning before deciding on a correct answer.  Write on the question paper, use it for rough work and planning.  And RTQ carefully – with many similar but incorrect answers on the page, it is so easy to decide too quickly what the correct response is and so miss out on marks you could obtain with a little more care.

3) Try to eliminate the obviously incorrect answers:  this will mean you are only focussing your thinking on the possibles.  It also means if you have to guess, you are maximising your odds of being lucky!  But be careful….. This strategy has an obvious flaw so be careful in what you eliminate.

4) Your best chance of getting a question right is the first time you answer it. So I suggest you leave blank any answers you are unsure of on your first go through the paper.  Don’t spend more than a minute on any question on this first pass through the paper.  You can come back to look at the harder questions at the end of the exam.  It is much harder in an exam to spot an error in a question you have already answered, so I would leave answers blank unless I am sure I am right….

5) Keep an eye on the time.  After 20 minutes of the exam, check that you are ahead of the time.  Most multiple choice exams are a “mark a minute” but I know that in our internal exams this isn’t always the case, so check.  

6) Finally, make sure you answer every question.  There is only positive marking in these exams so you should always guess (see point 3 above).  The only way you can guarantee you won’t get a mark is if you leave the question blank!

Take a pencil and a rubber to these exams – both will be useful!  And good luck……..

E Michaelmas Biology trial 2015 – revision checklist

I suggest you go through this checklist and make sure you understand each point fully….. This list could be the basis for making some revision notes.

  • Understand the differences between atoms and molecules
  • What is a polymer?  Give some biological examples of polymers and describe their structure.
  • What are the chemical tests for glucose and starch?
  • How do enzymes work as catalysts?
  • Draw a graph to show how temperature effects the rate of an enzyme-catalysed reaction.  Annotate the graph to explain why this pattern is observed.
  • Now do the same but for the effect of pH on enzyme reactions…..
  • Write down the word and balanced chemical equations for photosynthesis.
  • Why is photosynthesis such an important process in the plant (and in the ecosystem)?
  • Draw an annotated diagram to show the structure of a leaf and how it is adapted for photosynthesis.
  • How do you test a leaf for starch?  How do you measure rates of photosynthesis using Cabomba? What variables could you alter in this set up?
  • Explain differences in function between xylem and phloem.
  • How is water absorbed in root hair cells?  Explain osmosis (good luck!)
  • What are the differences between diffusion and active transport?  Give two biological examples of each.
  • What is transpiration?  How can you measure it?
  • What factors affect rates of transpiration in a plant?
  • What is the difference between a pesticide and a fertiliser?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of chemical pesticides and biological control of pests?

F Block revision: Part 1 Trials 2014

You might like to make revision notes or cards to address the following questions…. If you managed this, you would be well prepared for your end of term exam.

1. Explain the difference in meaning between cell, organelle, organism, tissue and organ.

2. Understand the relative size of atoms, molecules, viruses, bacterial cells, animal cells, plant cells.

3. Draw two fully labelled diagrams one of an animal cell, one of a plant cell and describe clearly the differences in structure between the two.

4. Understand the structure and function of the following organelles: cell membrane, plant cell wall, nucleus, chloroplast, mitochondrion, sap vacuole, ribosome and also the function of the cytoplasm.

5. Explain why respiration is an important process in all cells.

6. What kind of processes in cells require energy from respiration?

7. Learn the word and balanced chemical equation for aerobic respiration.

8. Learn the word equation for anaerobic respiration in animal cells and in plants/fungi.

9. Describe the differences between aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

10. Describe the structure of the thorax (ribs, lungs, intercostal muscles, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, pleural membranes, diaphragm).

11. Understand the mechanism of breathing – both in and out – using diaphragm and the two sets of intercostal muscles.

12. Understand how alveoli are adapted for efficient gas exchange.

13. Understand the process of diffusion and examples of diffusion in living things.

14. Understand how surface area:volume ratios affect the rate of diffusion and why this might be significant for living organisms.

15. Understand the consequences of smoking on the lungs and circulatory systems.

16. Understand how the processes of respiration and photosynthesis interact in the leaves of plants.

17. Know the tissue structure of the leaf and the role of stomata in gas exchange.

18. How a leaf is adapted both for photosynthesis and also for gas exchange.

19. Understand the hydrogencarbonate indicator practicals and why different results are obtained in the three set up tubes.